Cuckoo - the Ambassadors for environmental education
School kids and scientists are following five cuckoos fitted with GPS transmitters to learn about their conservation challenges
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Mongolia’s heaviest flying bird undertakes a long migration
A team of researchers from the USA and Mongolia deployed satellite transmitters to monitor the movement of female Great Bustards captured at their breeding sites in northern Mongolia.
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Death of saker falcons by electrocution from power lines
Thousands of birds of prey including the iconic saker falcons are electrocuted across Mongolia on powerlines. Researchers fight to stop the killing and find solution
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Mongolia's young but burgeoning bird ringing stations
Our biologists are building a network of bird ringing stations in the country. We believe there is a huge potential for this network of ringing stations to contribute to science, conservation, and society.
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News
First GPS tracking study of the Dalmatian Pelican in East Asia GPS tracking of highly threatened Dalmatian Pelicans in East Asia reveals some amazing journeys along the flyway. We very much hope that this study will lead to population recovery of this subpopulation in East Asia.
News
Bromadiolone related non-target poisoning of Demoiselle Cranes The risk of accidentally poisoning non-target wildlife is a less spoken environmental problem in Mongolia. Birds often become the victim of such non-target poisoning. Recently an incident that involved an agricultural chemical called - Bromadiolone - killed Demoiselle cranes and Ruddy Shelducks in central Mongolia.
News
Cuckoos - the ambassadors for a scientific and environmental project Five cuckoos were fitted with transmitters in Khurkh Valley. The birds have been named by local schools who will follow “their” birds to learn about the migration route and wintering grounds of cuckoos.
YELLOW-BREASTED BUNTING

The Yellow-breasted Bunting was formerly a common bird that spread from Finland to eastern Siberia with wintering grounds in China and south-east Asia. Now the species is on the brink of extinction and urgent conservation and management practices must be planned and implemented to safeguard this species. Mongolia is one of the countries that still supports breeding populations of Yellow-breasted Buntings in Asia. 

 

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Wetlands are the most threatened habitat in Mongolia
Mongolia has already lost numerous wetlands due to climate change, poor land management, and overgrazing. As a result many wetland dependent wildlife species are badly affected. We need to act together to save our wetlands.
First GPS tracking study of the Dalmatian Pelican in East Asia GPS tracking of highly threatened Dalmatian Pelicans in East Asia reveals some amazing journeys along the flyway. We very much hope that this study will lead to population recovery of this subpopulation in East Asia.
Bromadiolone related non-target poisoning of Demoiselle Cranes in Mongolia The risk of accidentally poisoning non-target wildlife is a less spoken environmental problem in Mongolia. Birds often become the victim of such non-target poisoning. Recently an incident that involved an agricultural chemical called - Bromadiolone - killed Demoiselle cranes and Ruddy Shelducks in central Mongolia.
A new crane species recorded for Mongolia Recently, a young Black-necked crane was photographed in Mongolia making everybody to wonder how this bird arrived here.
Nomadic Expeditions launches conservation partnership to protect golden eagles and support Mongolia’s cultural heritage We are partnering with the Nomadic Expeditions, the award-winning eco-tourism company, and the Peregrine Fund, a worldwide known raptor conservation organization, to protect the golden eagles and preserve our cultural heritage in Mongolia.
The shocking effects of power distribution on Saker Falcons in the Mongolian steppes Young falcons are particularly susceptible to electrocution. Also the sex of electrocuted adult Sakers suggests a possible male-biased sex ratio among adult Saker Falcons in Mongolia. Consequently, the electrocution threatens the long term survival of the species in one of its last remaining strongholds.
Mongolia's young but burgeoning bird ringing stations Our biologists are building a network of bird ringing stations in the country. We believe there is a huge potential for this network of ringing stations to contribute to science, conservation, and society in Mongolia.